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Updates Index

21 resources found.

  • The effects of early auditory deprivation – insights from children with cochlear implants
    Michèle Pettinato
    This update explores the importance of early auditory stimulation by considering the development of speech processing skills in profoundly deaf children who have received a cochlear implant. This literature is relevant to issues affecting children with Down syndrome, because like them, children with cochlear implants have hearing difficulties, but unlike the former, they do not have oral-motor issues.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2009. doi:10.3104/updates.2119
  • Modelling Down syndrome
    Frank Buckley
    Animal models are extensively used in genetics, neuroscience and biomedical research. Recent studies illustrate the usefulness and the challenges of research utilising genetically engineered mice to explore the developmental biology of Down syndrome. These studies highlight many of the issues at the centre of what we understand about Down syndrome, and may one day point to useful ways to improve quality of life for people living with Down syndrome.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2008. doi:10.3104/updates.2054
  • It is time to take memory training seriously
    Sue Buckley
    It has been known for a long while that children with Down syndrome have specific impairments in verbal shortterm memory. Research now indicates that memory training activities may be effective.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2008. doi:10.3104/updates.2092
  • Folate metabolism and the risk of Down syndrome
    David Patterson
    Folate is an important vitamin that contributes to cell division and growth and is therefore of particular importance during infancy and pregnancy. Folate deficiency has been associated with slowed growth, anaemia, weight loss, digestive disorders and some behavioural issues. Adequate folate intake around the time of conception and early pregnancy can reduce the risk of certain problems including neural tube defects. It has been suggested that certain versions (polymorphisms) of some genes can increase the risk of conceiving a baby with Down syndrome. If this is the case, then people with Down syndrome may be more likely to carry these forms of these genes and to experience associated problems in folate metabolism. Studies to date have found conflicting results, suggesting that these gene variants may be part of a more complex picture. In this issue, a further study reports no association between the presence of a common polymorphism of one of these genes and the risk of having a child with Down syndrome among mothers of Northern Indian origin. This article reviews these challenging findings and looks at where investigations can now go to resolve these issues.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2008. doi:10.3104/updates.2051
  • The power of behavioural approaches – we need a revival
    Sue Buckley
    Behavioural approaches can be used very effectively to teach new skills and to change behaviours that are challenging and not socially adaptive. They have gone out of fashion but should be revived, as the studies discussed here indicate.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2008. doi:10.3104/updates/2038
  • Drug treatment improves memory in mice
    Frank Buckley and Ben Sacks
    Mice that carry additional copies of genes comparable to those present on human chromosome 21 have been shown to perform better on memory tests when treated with drugs that target brain function. Could this be an important break-through in the search for pharmacological therapies to assist people with Down syndrome?
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2037
  • Teeth grinding
    Sue Buckley
    Teeth grinding turns out to be no more common in children with Down syndrome than it is in other children and it reduces with age. These are reassuring findings as teeth grinding can be quite an annoying problem at home and at school.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2048
  • Shaping speech
    Sue Buckley
    Clear speech can often be challenging for people with Down syndrome. The shape of the hard palate in the top of the mouth influences speech production. A new paper reports detailed measures of the shape and size of the hard palate among children with Down syndrome.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2050
  • Oral health problems and quality of life
    Sue Buckley and Ben Sacks
    There is a higher incidence of oral health problems among individuals with Down syndrome, particulary after 10 years of age, indicating a need for better teaching of teeth brushing and more regular visits to the dentist. Do these oral health problems affect their quality of life?
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2049
  • Increasing opportunities for physical activity
    Sue Buckley
    Being physically active can have a number of benefits – having fun, meeting with friends, keeping healthy and experiencing success. For children with Down syndrome the foundations need to be laid early if they are to keep active in school, teenage and adult years and parents ask for more help in this area from professionals.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2033
  • Teaching numeracy
    Sue Buckley
    Understanding number concepts and basic mathematical skills is important for many everyday activities in modern societies. Little is understood about the numeracy abilities of people with Down syndrome. At present, it appears that numeracy is an area of relative difficulty and that progress with more complex mathematical understanding is slow. However, some teaching approaches that seek to utilise certain relative strengths to communicate number concepts seem to be useful in practice. Further research is needed to define the precise difficulties experienced by children with Down syndrome and to evaluate teaching strategies.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/updates.2031
  • Evaluating the Numicon system as a tool for teaching number skills to children with Down syndrome
    Joanna Nye, Sue Buckley and Gillian Bird
    Does Numicon help children with Down syndrome to learn about numbers and to and calculate? Do some benefit more than others? Does it need adapting?
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/updates.352
  • Autism and Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    How many children with Down syndrome also have autism and how do we meet their needs?
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/updates.341
  • The development of the Down syndrome phenotype
    Amanda Wood
    In the first of these new features, Mandy summarises a discussion between the Trust’s practitioners, which focused on a new research paper by Deborah Fidler entitled ‘The emerging Down syndrome behavioural phenotype in early childhood’
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/updates.346
  • Vision in children with Down syndrome: a research update
    J. Margaret Woodhouse
    Vision in children with Down syndrome: a research update
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/updates.337
  • What do we know about the movement abilities of children with Down syndrome?
    Ben Sacks and Sue Buckley
    Abstract available shortly
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/updates.193
  • The achievements of teenagers with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley, Gillian Bird, Ben Sacks and Tamsin Archer
    Part 2: What do we know about the progress of teenagers with Down syndrome, their daily lives and their needs? Part 1 of this article was published in Down Syndrome News and Update Volume 2 Issue 2.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/updates.178
  • A comparison of mainstream and special education for teenagers with Down syndrome: implications for parents and teachers
    Sue Buckley, Gillian Bird, Ben Sacks and Tamsin Archer
    A survey was conducted in 1999 of teenagers with Down syndrome in Hampshire (n = 46), replicating and extending a previous survey conducted in 1987 (n = 90). A questionnaire which covered all aspects of the teenagers lives was completed by parents, along with standardised scales (Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale and Conners Rating scales) which assessed daily living skills, communication skills and socialisation skills. Significant progress was seenin these areas with age, with the exception of communication skills in children in special schools. No differences were found between children attending mainstream and special schools in terms of daily living skills and most aspects of socialisation. However, the teenagers who had attended special schools had higher scores on interpersonal relationships, as the older teenagers in this group were more likely to have a boyfriend or girlfriend, a special friend and belong to clubs. Communication skills were significantly better in the mainstream group. In addition, despite general increases in academic expectations, a lack of progress in skills was observed in the 1999 special school group compared to the teenagers who took part in the 1987 survey. The extent of behaviour difficulties was also measured and behaviour was found to improve with age. Concerns that mainstream education may increase reports of difficult behaviour were not confirmed, with children in mainstream education less likely to have difficulties. The conclusion is drawn that inclusion has achieved what was hoped for in spoken language, behaviour, social development and academic benefits, but not for social inclusion. Recommendations for addressing this final point are presented.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/updates.166
  • The early reading skills of preschoolers with Down syndrome and their typically developing peers - findings from recent research
    Michele Appleton, Sue Buckley and John MacDonald
    Some early readers with Down syndrome find 'sight word' learning very easy and it appears to have very positive effects on the development of their spoken language skills and general cognitive development. This research study shows that preschool children with Down syndrome are able to learn sight words just as fast as age matched typical preschoolers.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/updates.157
  • Conference Report: The National Down Syndrome Society's 11th International Down Syndrome Research Conference on Cognition and Behaviour (Florida, November 1997)
    Sue Buckley
    A report on The National Down Syndrome Society's 11th International Down Syndrome Research Conference on Cognition and Behaviour in Florida in November 1997, focusing on infancy, speech and language, early communication and later social skills, reading and language, short-term memory, adolescence and early adulthood, adult mental health, issues for older adults and medical/genetic research.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1998. doi:10.3104/updates.142
  • Bilingual children with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    Brief comments about questions concerning bilingualism and individuals with Down syndrome.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1998. doi:10.3104/updates.141

Reading and Language Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome (RLI)

DSE's Reading and Language Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome (RLI) is an evidence-based programme designed to teach reading and language skills to children with Down syndrome.

RLI incorporates best practice in structured activities delivered in fast-paced daily teaching sessions. It was evaluated in a randomised controlled trial and found to improve rates of progress compared to ordinary teaching.

Find out more...