Photograph of a children engaged in early learning activities

Practice Index

94 resources found.

  • Investigating free software for children with Down syndrome
    Bob Black
    The use of ICT as an aid to learning has been an integral part of special education for over 20 years in the UK. During this time software resources have developed that are particularly relevant to the learning profile of this group of learners. As access to computers and the Internet becomes cheaper and more available, the 'Digital Divide' gets smaller as more homes have access to resources that enhance the lives and learning of traditionally more isolated groups. While more able users have access to a whole host of free to use activities both on the computer and increasingly 'On Line', young people with cognitive and motor difficulties can struggle to find 'user friendly' resources that meet their needs. This simple investigation brings together information on free resources that tackle this problem and make available a range of educational and leisure opportunities that are more likely meet the individual needs of a range of young people with Down syndrome.
    [Article] [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2010. doi:10.3104/practice.2116
  • Supporting a child with Down syndrome through Reading Recovery
    Sarah Kent
    This article describes the Reading Recovery approach to supporting children's literacy development and evaluates the significant benefits of the approach for a pupil with Down syndrome.
    [Article] [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2010. doi:10.3104/practice.2083
  • Using photographs to scaffold literacy activities with young adults with Down syndrome
    Karen Moni and Anne Jobling
    This article describes how photographs have been used in literacy activities for young adults with Down syndrome participating in a post-school literacy programme. We describe how the principled use of photographs in literacy teaching can: scaffold literacy learning, specifically in the writing of stories and recounts; support writing about abstract concepts, and support extended autobiographical writing with learners who have diverse literacy strengths and needs. Photographs are intrinsically interesting resources for developing literacy because they are actual representations of important known events in young adults’ lives. Thus in talking and writing about photographs, these young adults are motivated to construct extended texts that have relevance to their own lives. The learners’ developed written texts can be used as more accessible reading material.
    [Article] [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2010. doi:10.3104/practice.2134
  • The voice of the child with Down syndrome
    Julie Hooton and Anna Westaway
    An exciting multi-agency project to create a future for children with Down syndrome where they can more effectively express their opinions. This work recognises the need to remove barriers and push boundaries associated with the reduced ability to verbalise and was planned to give every child with Down syndrome in mainstream schooling in Buckinghamshire the chance to express themselves in an alternative way and to chart visually their own judgement of progress. It explores success in enabling a child to be able to contribute in a personally meaningful and accurate way to the annual review process and beyond, using complementary professional expertise.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2008. doi:10.3104/practice.2064
  • Handling the transfer to secondary school
    Elaine Bull
    The transfer to secondary education can be an anxious time and planning ahead can help. This article offers practical advice about what to consider, when to start planning and discusses many of the issues involved in the transition to later schooling. Written from the perspective of the English school system, many of the issues and principles are broadly applicable.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document] [Article]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2016
  • Special at school but lonely at home: An alternative friendship group for adolescents with Down syndrome
    Jeanne D’Haem
    Friends play a significant role in mental and physical health; however, individuals with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities, even those who are included in general education programmes, have not developed friendships as hoped. After a decade of inclusion and structured school programmes to facilitate friendships, many parents report that peer relationships end after school hours. This study compared the efficacy of school based friendship groups with a mixed age home based group. Specific methods to establish a successful friendship group are discussed. This study followed three friendship groups for five years. Two groups of six to eight general education students met with the target student twice a month during the school day; one group of mixed age participants met in the student’s home. A counsellor facilitated all the groups. Parent and student concerns regarding friendships were informally assessed with interviews and observations. Observations and interviews confirmed that although peer interactions during school occurred they did not continue after school. Of the three students studied, only one had a relationship with a same-aged peer after four years of school facilitated groups. Two students had significant feelings of depression during high school. One student entered counselling. The home-based mixed age friendship group did result in significant friendships. The individual participated in two or three activities each month with friends from the group. School based friendship groups of adolescent peers were not successful in developing friendships for individuals with Down syndrome. When a multi-age group was conducted outside of the school, friendships formed and have continued for over two years. This article describes how and why parents and professionals should look beyond school based same age peer friendship groups and consider a community circle of mixed-age friends.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document] [Article]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2012
  • Katrina’s progress with learning mathematics
    Jan McConnochie and Greg Sneath
    Katrina is 10 years old and has Down syndrome. She is making good progress with learning and numbers and mathematics. We describe how Katrina has learned number concepts and arithmetic skills over several years. We highlight the influence of early learning habits, visual supports, motivation and practice, and the uses made of different number teaching schemes.
    [Article] [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2014
  • Sam’s progress with learning mathematics
    Lynne Haslam
    Sam is 18 years old and has Down syndrome. He achieved a grade in the standard assessment of mathematics (GCSE) at 16 years of age. This paper describes the part played in his success in school by the Kumon method of teaching mathematics, identifies the benefits of the small steps and lots of practice built in to the method and illustrates the way Sam applied his Kumon learning in school.
    [Article] [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2019
  • Teaching number skills and concepts with Stern Structural Arithmetic materials
    Vikki Horner
    This paper discusses the use of Stern teaching materials with children with Down syndrome. The theory underlying the design of the materials is discussed, the teaching approach and methodology are described and evidence supporting effectiveness is outlined.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document] [Article]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2020
  • Teaching number skills and concepts with Numicon materials
    Tony Wing and Romey Tacon
    This paper discusses the use of Numicon number teaching materials with children with Down syndrome. The theory underlying the design of the materials is discussed, the teaching approach and methodology are described and evidence supporting effectiveness is outlined.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document] [Article]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice (Online). 2007. doi:10.3104/practice.2018
  • Breaking the hype cycle: Using the computer effectively with learners with intellectual disabilities
    Jan Lloyd, Karen Moni and Anne Jobling
    There has been huge growth in the use of information technology (IT) in classrooms for learners of all ages. It has been suggested that computers in the classroom encourage independent and self-paced learning, provide immediate feedback and improve self-motivation and self-confidence. Concurrently there is increasing interest related to the role of technology in educational programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities. However, although many claims are made about the benefits of computers and software packages there is limited evidence based information to support these claims. Researchers are now starting to look at the specific instructional design features that are hypothesised to facilitate education outcomes rather than the over-emphasis on graphics and sounds. Research undertaken as part of a post-school program (Latch-On: Literacy and Technology - Hands On) at the University of Queensland investigated the use of computers by young adults with intellectual disabilities. The aims of the research reported in this paper were to address the challenges identified in the 'hype' surrounding different pieces of educational software and to develop a means of systematically analysing software for use in teaching programs.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.296
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    Is it more common than we think?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.362
  • Our flight with Rina
    Ruth Palatnik
    How medication and behaviour management have facilitated inclusion for Rina, an 11 year old with Down syndrome and ADHD
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.363
  • The holistic learning outcomes of musical play for children with Down syndrome
    Julie Wylie
    How music and song can enrich social interaction and develop motor, socio-emotional and cognitive development and speech and language skills
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.360
  • Our journey with Hirschsprungs
    Sue Wong
    How one family have coped with their son’s intestinal disease, a condition which has left him incontinent for over ten years
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.364
  • Jane’s education
    Elaine Mitchell
    To follow
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.351
  • Teaching reading skills to children with Down syndrome
    Julie Hughes
    To follow
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.349
  • Developing working memory skills for children with Down syndrome
    Julie Hughes
    To follow
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.348
  • Educational software for children with Down syndrome - an update
    Bob Black
    To follow
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.350
  • Luke’s successful secondary transfer
    Jane Randell
    How careful planning and preparation have continued The Randall family’s excellent experiences of inclusion
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.365
  • Plenty of potential
    Marie Dunleavy
    Developing a reading scheme for children with Down syndrome
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.361
  • Just Joe
    Shelley Ducarreaux
    Senior school selection
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.367
  • Handling the transfer to secondary school – part 2
    Elaine Bull
    Personal experiences of issues to consider when choosing a secondary school - continued from Down Syndrome News and Update 5(2)
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.371
  • Job satisfaction
    Vikki Horner
    A two-week spell of work experience for one young girl with Down syndrome provided an opportunity for her to learn and grow from the new challenges she faced
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.372
  • Learning about number and maths
    Julie Hughes
    Adapting teaching to the learning profile of children with Down syndrome
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.374
  • Feely-bag games
    Alexa Lander
    Ideas to aid recognition by touch
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.375
  • Inclusive education for individuals with Down syndrome
    Julie Hughes
    Inclusion in education – the benefits and keys to success
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.370
  • The “let’s pretend” pupils
    Caroline Tidemand-Andersen
    To follow
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.366
  • Developing education and health services for Iraqi children with Down syndrome
    Mustafa/Mansour
    A mother and teacher describes how she developed a private school and clinic for children with Down syndrome in Baghdad and her work in founding The Iraqi Down Syndrome Association
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.369
  • Handling the transfer to secondary school
    Elaine Bull
    Personal experiences of issues to consider when choosing a secondary school
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2006. doi:10.3104/practice.368
  • The Mexican School of Down Art
    Sylvia Escamilla
    Fostering the creativity of people with Down syndrome
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.335
  • Creative arts, imagination and expression - An important way of being, sharing and feeling?
    Sue Buckley
    Creative arts, imagination and expression - An important way of being, sharing and feeling?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.334
  • Psychological support provided to families of young children with Down syndrome
    Pauline Zhiyanova
    In this article we are presenting an outline of the experience of the Moscow Downside Up Early Intervention Centre and our focus in our early support service.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.354
  • Matteo and facilitated communication
    Christine Tracey
    Matteo and facilitated communication
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.338
  • Learning through doing
    Joan Medlen
    Joan’s son Andy has Down syndrome and autism. She explains in this article how she uses practical experiences, such as making bread together, supported with matching, selecting and naming activities, to teach new vocabulary.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.353
  • Provision of coordinated care for individuals with Down syndrome: The Calgary perspective
    Donna Heerensperger
    The benefits of a multidisciplinary/coordinated approach for individuals with Down syndrome
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.342
  • An update on the developments of the Down Syndrome Support Group Bradford
    Wendy Uttley
    Development of a parent-run service in the north of England
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.355
  • A conversation tool for Samuel
    Julie Gilmore
    A conversation tool for Samuel
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2005. doi:10.3104/practice.339
  • Using the computer with Megan
    Elaine Bull
    Using the computer with Megan
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.332
  • An update on Sam and the progress he has made in numeracy using Numicon
    Wendy Uttley
    Wendy describes how she imaginatively overcame her son Sam’s difficulties with the count word sequence using home-made materials.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.327
  • Number fun? You can count on it!
    Emma Saunders
    Emma explains how she devised a range of fun-packed, differentiated numeracy activities for seven-year old Richard. She also describes how she extended some of the activities that she began using as part of the Numicon project with Dr Joanna Nye.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.326
  • Supporting learning and development with ICT
    Amanda Wood
    This article identifies a number of reasons why ICT may be a particularly important tool for supporting the learning needs of children with Down syndrome and examines a variety of ways in which ICT can be integrated into teaching situations at home and at school.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.325
  • Using the hookboard with preschool children with Down syndrome
    Denise Pattison
    Using the hookboard with preschool children with Down syndrome
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.333
  • Mathematical targets and personal autonomy
    Anna Contardi, Michele Pertichino and Brunetto Piochi
    This article explains how mathematical skills can foster independence for daily living and how we should always have high expectations for children with Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.328
  • Sexuality and Relationships Education for people with Down syndrome
    Amanda Wood
    All children and young people should be entitled to good quality sex and relationships education that will allow them to develop the qualities, attitudes, skills and knowledge to develop into healthy, happy and fulfilled adults
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.330
  • Moving in circles
    Jo Slough, Belinda Griffiths, Liz Reynolds and Steve Kraemer
    Using a ‘Circle of Friends’ to support the inclusion of a pupil with Down syndrome into a mainstream infant school
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.331
  • Social inclusion and a full life is still a challenge
    Sue Buckley
    How do we help our children and adults to belong – to have friends, relationships and to be fully part of the community?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.329
  • Creative approaches to teaching and to differentiation
    Sue Buckley
    How do we create effective learning opportunities for children with Down syndrome?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.324
  • Understanding behaviour
    Sue Buckley
    How do we change ‘difficult’ behaviour and encourage ‘good’ behaviour?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.323
  • Speech and Language Therapy with Galina
    Gerda Stevenson
    This article explains how Gerda Stevenson, a professional actress from Peeblesshire in Scotland, gathered ideas from a variety of sources about activities to promote speech and language development. She describes how she was inspired to help her own daughter, Galina, and to work with other parents in lobbying local officials to improve the provision of services for children with communication difficulties, including Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.322
  • Magic and sparkles: a creative approach to modifying children’s behaviour
    Amanda Wood and Gillian Bird
    Sarah Tollast is employed by the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Team in Portsmouth, UK. We discovered how she has used ‘magic and sparkles’ to modify children’s behaviour across the city. This article introduces a series of techniques developed by Sarah and her colleagues. She says they are “nothing new, just traditional behaviour management principles plus a little imagination”.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2004. doi:10.3104/practice.321
  • Language and literacy
    Sue Buckley
    Language and literacy - continuing to explore language and literacy issues
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.194
  • Teaching number to children with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    Teaching number to children with Down syndrome - what do we need to know?
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.191
  • Bilingualism in children with Down syndrome in Germany
    Etta Wilken
    Abstract available shortly
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.197
  • Teaching language through reading to a child with Down syndrome
    Honor Mangan
    Abstract available shortly
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.195
  • Reading for teenagers and young adults
    Sue Buckley
    Abstract available shortly
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.203
  • Keeping Declan reading
    Jill O'Connor
    Abstract available shortly
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2003. doi:10.3104/practice.204
  • Learning to count and to understand number
    Sue Buckley
    Many children and teenagers with Down syndrome seem to find number more difficult than reading. As with all skills there is a wide range of individual variation in progress with somechildren enjoying number and progressing well. However many children find number difficult and there is little research as yet into the reasons for this. Two new approaches to teaching number skills appear to be promising in meeting the needs of the children.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.158
  • Wiltshire Pilot Project - Numicon (March-July 2001)
    Claire Ewan and Caroline Mair
    A pilot study investigating the effectiveness of the Numicon scheme for teaching number skills and concepts to children with Down syndrome was conducted in Wiltshire with eleven 10-12 year olds. Result varied for individual children, but on average the children made five months gain on a standardised test of number skills over four months of training. Issues relating to the use of the scheme were also identified in the study.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.159
  • Teaching Nazli in Turkish and English
    Mim Oke
    A father from Turkey describes how his daughter with Down syndrome has become bilingual in Turkish and English, using reading to teach language.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.156
  • Providing effective speech and language therapy for children with Down syndrome in mainstream settings: a case example
    Gillian Bird and Sue Thomas
    A description of how a specialist speech and language therapist has been working with a child with Down syndrome, who attends a mainstream primary school.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.163
  • Letter: Successful inclusion for Luke
    Jane Randell
    Luke's mother describes his experiences of attending the local infant and junior schools. She discusses frustrations, successes and some of the imaginative solutions the school and family have come up with to deal with difficulties.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.162
  • The significance of early reading for children with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    Reading is one of the most powerful ways of helping children with Down syndrome to overcome their speech, language and cognitive delays.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.152
  • Teaching reading to develop language
    Joe Kotlinski and Susan Kotlinski
    Love and Learning was founded 15 years ago to help special needs children develop language and reading skills.The authors of the scheme describe how their experiences of working with their own daughter, who was born with Down syndrome, convinced them that reading was an attainable goal for her and one which could bring her much enjoyment as well as serve as a vehicle for learning. The method is based on three concepts; (1) language learning starts from birth; (2) reading enhances language development and (3) the thoughtful use of technology coupled with parental involvement.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.154
  • Editorial
    Sue Buckley
    Editorial from Down Syndrome News and Update, Volume 2 Issue 1
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.151
  • Teaching Charlotte spoken language through reading
    Geoff Rozen
    The author describes his daughter's progress in reading and their experiences of services in New Zealand.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.155
  • Inclusion in education - what are the benefits and how do we make it successful?
    Sue Buckley
    An introduction to, and overview of, the two following articles on inclusion in education. It provides the background to the inclusion movement, and the author's experiences of changes in inclusive practices in the UK since the 1970s. The need to provide successful inclusion is highlighted.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.165
  • The use of a reading program and signing to develop language and communication skills in a toddler with Down syndrome
    Laura Dickinson
    The author outlines how reading has become part of her son David's life in his first four years.She outlines how reading to your child from birth has numerous and immeasurable positive effects including increasing attention span, providing opportunities for the child to hear speech, teaching the book's content, expanding the child's vocabulary and laying the groundwork for a lifelong love of reading. The written word can also be used as an effective tool in speech therapy.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.153
  • Learning mathematics at school....and later on
    Elisabetta Monari Martinez
    Evidence is presented of teenagers with Down syndrome learning algebra and of one 51-year-old learning how to count and tell the time for the first time, suggesting that we need to be carefulin our assumptions about what numerical skills people with Down syndrome can attain. The authoroutlines the main approaches she has drawn from working with these individuals.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.160
  • Independence and employment for adults with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    Provides an overview of the two following articles which discuss aspects of life for adults with Down syndrome. It highlights the importance of independent living skills, both at home and at work, for self-esteem and self-identity.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.168
  • Can children with Down syndrome learn more than one language?
    Sue Buckley
    Does learning a second language affect progress in a first language? Some new evidence is beginning to indicate that children with Down syndrome can pick up a second language like other children, with no negative effect on their first language.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.180
  • What do we know about the needs of children with Mosaic Down syndrome and their families?
    Sue Buckley and Gillian Bird
    Mosaic Down syndrome is rare and families feel lost when they receive this diagnosis - often weeks or months after the child's birth. A new association (the International Mosaic Down Syndrome Association) will lead to progress.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.179
  • Services and self-help groups - how do we ensure that everyone gets the help that they need?
    Sue Buckley
    Do we set up our own services or try to work in partnership with local providers? This article provides guidelines for establishing local services and introduces the two following articles by parents describing how they have set up early years intervention groups.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.181
  • Setting up a Toddler Group?
    Ann Haig
    This article describes the way in which a group has been set up in Ireland by parents. The group provides support and it aims to specifically promote the children's development through structured activities.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.182
  • Research studies - what can they tell us?
    Sue Buckley
    Is research any better than 'common sense'? This article provides a summary of the importance of research, and an introduction to, and overview of, the three following articles drawing on recent research into Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.177
  • Supporting the social inclusion of students with Down syndrome in mainstream education
    Gert de Graaf
    During the last three years, on behalf of the Dutch Down Syndrome Foundation, Gert de Graaf has conducted several research projects in relation to the social inclusion of students with Down syndrome in mainstream schools. As such, he has made a thorough survey of the international literature. In addition, he has conducted a series of in-depth interviews of teachers, special educators, school administrators, and parents of included children, and he has also made observations in the schools (both in the classrooms and in the playgrounds). On the basis of the findings of his research, he gives a list of practical recommendations for interventions aimed at improving the social inclusion of students with Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.167
  • Speech and language therapy for children with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley and Patricia Le Prèvost
    The provision of speech and language therapy services for children with Down syndrome is a controversial issue. Families receive different services depending on where they live, and the knowledge and interest of local speech and language therapists in the specific needs of children with Down syndrome. This article is an attempt to provide guidelines for speech and language therapists, based on the best evidence of the children's speech and language needs currently available. It is a summary of the key facts about their speech and language profile and needs, followed by recommendations for service provision.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.171
  • Employing adults with Down syndrome
    Steve Henwood and Jackie Dixon
    A partnership between The Down Syndrome Educational Trust and a supported employment service backed by the European Social Fund has created part-time jobs for five young people with Down syndrome. Staff from both organisations report on how the young people were supported when they started the jobs, and how they have fitted into the team. It is hoped that the example will encourage other employers to provide similar work.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.170
  • Increasing expressive vocabulary through parental recognition
    Joe Kotlinski and Susan Kotlinski
    An update to the article by the authors published in issue 2(1) of Down Syndrome News and Update. It describes a simple technique for increasing expressive vocabulary in children with Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 2002. doi:10.3104/practice.172
  • Meeting the educational needs of pupils with Down syndrome in mainstream secondary schools
    Gillian Bird and Sue Buckley
    This article provides information and advice to secondary schools that are including a pupil with Down syndrome. The advice is based on our experience of observing and supporting individuals in secondary schools that are including pupils with Down syndrome in Portsmouth and South East Hampshire. It informs secondary schools that have not yet included a pupil with significant learning or language difficulties that the key to success is through developing systems and procedures for meeting the wide range of individual educational needs of all young people. The article emphasises the importance of developing opportunities for: (1) personal and social development, (2) teaching, differentiation and support for learning, and (3) training for staff on all issues related to disability awareness, inclusion and expectations for people with learning and language disabilities, including Down syndrome.
    [HTML Document] [PDF Document]

    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1999. doi:10.3104/practice.148
  • Improving the speech and language skills of children and teenagers with Down syndrome
    Sue Buckley
    This article reviews the research on speech and language in children and adolescents with Down syndrome from a practical point of view. It identifies the typical profile of speech and language development, emphasising the variability in development for different individuals, and describes the main reasons for this profile as far as they are understood at the present time. Drawing on this information and what is known about the processes of speech and language development in typically developing children, the paper sets out principles to guide parents, teachers and speech and language therapists as they interact with the children in their care. The main difficulties experienced by children with Down syndrome can be grouped under several headings; difficulties in hearing, auditory perception and processing, difficulties with clear speech production and greater difficulty in learning grammar than vocabulary. These, in turn, are likely to effect the quality and quantity of the language learning opportunities available to the children. Babies and children with Down syndrome need more, high quality learning opportunities in order for them to learn and remember the meanings of words and sentences, yet they get less opportunities because of their slower progress. The author argues that most children and young people with Down syndrome could be helped to improve their speech and language skills if we simply applied the knowledge that we now have more effectively.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1999. doi:10.3104/practice.146
  • Making inclusion work for children with Down syndrome
    Stephanie Lorenz
    This article reports the findings from a survey of over 400 families, investigating their experiences of inclusive education in the United Kingdom. The findings indicate considerable variation in provision between different Local Education Authorities across the UK. The article details indications of good practice and appropriate provision as found in the survey results.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1999. doi:10.3104/practice.149
  • Singing and music as aids to language development and its relevance for children with Down syndrome
    Judy Barker
    Singing and making music are among the most enjoyable learning activities for children. Because they have both elements - enjoyment and learning - I consider them to be essential methods of reinforcing basic skills in numeracy and literacy. While this reinforcement is useful to all children, regardless of their academic abilities, my own experiences in the classroom and as the mother of a child with Down syndrome tell me that it is vital to children with learning difficulties.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1999. doi:10.3104/practice.147
  • The Educational Course in the Acquisition of the Autonomy of Associazone Italiana Persone Down
    Anna Contardi
    The Associazione Italiana Persone Down is an association of families which acts as a reference point for the parents of children and adults affected by Down syndrome. To stimulate and sustain the growth of the autonomy of persons with Down syndrome, the first educational course aimed at developing a capacity for autonomy was introduced in the AIPD in Rome in 1989. The course, which was designed for boys and girls from 15 to 20 years, has been repeated every year with an ever greater participation and replicated in many other cities. The educational objectives proposed by the programme are grouped into five areas: communication, orientation, road behaviour, using money, shopping and more generally making use of services. All the youngsters involved exhibit change; at the end of the course all are able to cross roads by themselves, use a public telephone, ask information in order to resolve their difficulties and know how to go shopping. Furthermore, there are aspects of each persons personality, such as confidence in self, self-esteem, and the capacity to establish relations with others, which have undergone great changes in the direction of a greater knowledge. There is also structural development of their own identities, first and foremost as adolescents, and then as adolescents with certain limitations but nevertheless as adolescents able to do a wide variety of things.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1998. doi:10.3104/practice.82
  • The Group: An instrument of intervention for the global development of the child with Down syndrome in the process of social inclusion
    Rosa Borbones Lloveras and Marta Golano Fornells
    We present our experience with groups using symbolic games for children with Down syndrome between 7 and 10 years old. In the results, we have observed a clear evolution in the game levels and the interaction strategies. We have witnessed how the child is capable of organising progressively his or her own activity in an autonomous manner, how he/she becomes interested in the others in the group and the difficulties arising in the process. The child appears in front of the rest with his/her own peculiarities. From his/her own process of becoming aware, there appear a number of important elements in the process of construction of his/her own personal identity.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1998. doi:10.3104/practice.81
  • Including children with Down syndrome (Part 1)
    Sue Buckley and Gillian Bird
    This article provides guidelines to good practice in developing the inclusive school, considering the importance of the role of the Headteacher and managers in developing school philosophy, values and culture, school organisation, staff training and the management of resources. We then consider the role of the teacher in developing inclusive classrooms and finally the role of all the pupils in developing peer support.
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1998. doi:10.3104/practice.139
  • Including children with Down syndrome (Part 2) From the community to the individual
    Sue Buckley and Gillian Bird
    The second of a two-part series on successful inclusion in mainstream education focusing on the issues relevant to understanding the learning needs of the individual child and to planning the curriculum in the classroom. (First part was published in Down Syndrome News and Update Volume 1 Issue 1).
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    Down Syndrome News and Update. 1998. doi:10.3104/practice.143
  • The development of communication skills through drama
    Sarah Chatterton and Sian Butler
    Providing a Speech and Language therapy service to children with Severe Learning Difficulties (S.L.D.) offers much opportunity for multidisciplinary work. This summer I decided to take advantage of the links with Drama Therapy and run a short course of five weekly sessions for a group of seven children with the aim of developing communication skills through the use of drama. Five of the seven children had Down syndrome and all were integrated into local mainstream schools.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1994. doi:10.3104/practice.35
  • It is never too late to learn to work: An experience with adults with Down syndrome developed in Majorca, Spain
    Juan Perera
    This paper describes the establishment of a 'state of the art' commercial greenhouse, where all the horticulture is carried out by adults with Down syndrome. These adults grew up at a time when the educational opportunities and social experiences available to them were extremely limited. This project has shown them capable of learning a range of new skills to a high level and it has brought them dignity, independence and enhanced their self-esteem. A video tape of the project is available from the author.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1994. doi:10.3104/practice.28
  • Moving Daniel to mainstream at 9 years old
    Margaret Churchill
    Daniel is 10 1/2 years old, and has been in mainstream school for nearly two terms, since September 1992. The school is a small C. E. Primary school with 115 children on roll arranged in 4 classes, so each class spans two year groups. Daniel is in year 5, with other children of his own age, and one year older. Previously he was at a special school for mild learning difficulties from the age of 2 1/2 years.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1993. doi:10.3104/practice.16
  • Teaching Miles in his first year in mainstream school
    Deborah Burbridge and Jacqueline Orchard
    Miles is 6 years old. He has Down syndrome and particularly severe dyspraxic problems which make learning to speak very difficult for him. With co-ordinated treatment of dyspraxia at home and school his speech is improving, but remains his greatest difficulty. His comprehension of speech has always been excellent for a child with Down syndrome, and his teacher reports comprehension comparable with his peers in class.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1993. doi:10.3104/practice.15
  • Early intervention in the Netherlands: The struggle of a syndrome specific organisation
    Erik de Graaf
    As a country the Netherlands is generally known for its superior services for people with learning disabilities. However, in recent years, the introduction of early support for very young children has proved to be very difficult and time-consuming. This paper has been prepared by request of the European Committee of the International League of Societies for persons with Mental Handicap (ILSMH).
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1993. doi:10.3104/practice.4
  • Collaborative working practices in special schools
    Gill Taylor, Susan Dobson and Les Staves
    Teachers of children with severe learning disability have found that the National Curriculum has emphasised how communication affects all the subject areas. This has resulted in positive practices developing between education and health professionals.
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    Down Syndrome Research and Practice. 1993. doi:10.3104/practice.17
  • Cherry at mainstream secondary school
    One mainstream secondary school's experience of inclusion
    doi:10.3104/practice.275